Grant's vintage electronics
and electrical kit collection

I didn't intentionally start collecting these kits, but after a while, I seem to have accumulated a nice and varied set of kits.
All but one are 100% working, complete, and in good condition and I have constructed circuits using each of them.
My interest in kits covers the 1960's, 70's and 80's. What is shown here are the kits I have in chronological order.

Last update: 3rd July 2015

Index

1960 Trans Tronic Super 60
1966 Philips Electronic Engineer EE8
1966 Philips Electronic Engineer A20
1968 9 In One Electronic Kit
196? Lumen 20 in One Project Kit
1969 Heathkit Jr Deluxe Electronic Workshop
1969 Radionic X30
196? Denshi Board SR-1A
1970 Lafayette 150-In-1
197? Thomas Salter Electrical Lab 4
1973 Logix-Kosmos Science Fun Experiments In Electronics
1974 Science Fair Electronics 40 Research Lab Kit (Science Fun Experiments In Electronics)
1974 Logix-Kosmos Science Fun Experiments In Super Electronics 1
1974 Logix Kosmos Motor Generator
1974 Denshi Block SR 3A Deluxe (kit in this collection is from approx 1980)
1974 Denshi Block SR 4A Deluxe
1974 Denshi Block ST100
1975 Philips Radionic X40
1976 Super Electronic Thing Kit (Science Fun Experiments In Super Electronics I)
1978 Denshi-Gakken EX-150
1979 Radionic (Gakken) Mykit System 7
1979 Magnus Pyke's Science Fun Electronics
1983 Science Fair 160 in One
1984 Science Fair Solar Power Lab (a different version first appeared in 1976)
1985 Science Fair Microcomputer Trainer
1986 Computer Logic Lab
1988 Science Fair 200 in One (a different version first appeared in 1982)
198? Tree Of Knowledge World Of Radio & Electronics
198? Intertan 300 in 1
198? Unilab Adventures With Electronics
 

Dates shown are based on when an advertisement first appeared in a UK popular electronics magazine (eg Everyday Electronics) or when first appeared in a catalogue (Radio Shack for the Science Fair kits) etc. Many kits had a very long lifespan and were still available several years after the first introduction. Where publication dates not known, the copyright date on the documentation with the kit is used.
Denshi/Gakken kits were supplied through "Electroni-Kit" in the UK. Radio Shack kits supplied through the Tandy stores.


Trans Tronic Super 60

Possibly the earliest multi-circuit electronics construction kit. The supplied circuits are all radio based, and consist of receivers and transmitters.
The box is all cardboard with cut-outs for the components. The baseboard is made of hardboard with a grid of holes drilled in it. The seven circuits are printed on paper which has punched holes in it to line up with the holes on the board. These holes are used to hold the components in place by pushing component carriers into the holes to hold them securely.
Each component is securely mounted on a plastic carrier with the component wires soldered to two or more spring clips. These can be pressed down to allow a wire to be inserted. The clip is then released to hold the wire.
The circuits are printed on the paper overlays along with component placement. The supplied manual is a thin booklet starting off with construction basics, followed by a short description of each circuit.
The tuning is achieved using a fixed value capacitor but sliding a core in or out of the tuning coil.

Here is the card for Circuit 6 (a 2 transistor radio):

Circuit 6 constructed and working...


I couldn't get the 3V battery (obsolete?), so I use two AAA batteries.

A close-up of the spring-clip construction:

Factfile:
Approximate year of release: 1960
Power source: 3V battery
Transistors: 2
Resistors: 2
Capacitors: 3
Diodes: 1
Other: Tuning Coil, Morse Key, Headphone (single), Battery Holder
Number of circuits published: 7
Circuit construction: Place a paper circuit onto a perforated hardboard. Place components into the holes on the circuit then clip the wires onto the component assemblies.
Box size: 473mm x 292mm x 65mm


Philips Electronic Engineer EE8

The box consists of a cardboard shell with an expanded polystyrene insert. The basic kit is supplied with details to build 8 circuits and an add-on kit (A20) expands this to 20. All components are un-mounted. Each circuit layout is provided on a separate card with holes punched in it to take the spring terminals that are needed to build the circuit. The switch, tuning capacitor, potentiometer and batteries are also mounted onto the baseboard. Overlay cards provided to be mounted behind the tuning and volume controls. Each transistor and diode is kept in a separate cardboard box. Resistors are wrapped around a piece of card.

Here is an illustration (images from the manual) showing how each of the contacts on the board needs to be made before attaching components or wires:

A circuit card and the circuit diagram for a two transistor radio:

Factfile:
Approximate year of release: 1966
Power source: Two Ever Ready 1289 (4.5V) "flat" batteries
Transistors: 2
Resistors: 12
Capacitors: 8
Diodes: 1
Other Components: Inductor, LDR, light bulb, switched potentiometer, variable capacitor
Other: Ferrite rod, Tuning coil
Number of circuits published: 8
Circuit construction: Lay the card on the hardboard baseboard, take a hairpin spring clip and push it up the hole on the card from underneath. Take a spring and push it over the protruding hairpin. Repeat for all holes on the card. To make the circuit, push the spring down exposing the top of the A clip and slide one of the component wires into the exposed hole between the spring. Let go of the spring to push it up against the component.
Box size: 363mm x 260mm x 60mm


Philips Electronic Engineer A20 Add-on kit (for the EE8)

Factfile:
Approximate year of release: 1966
Transistors: 1
Resistors: 9
Capacitors: 0
Diodes: 0
Other Components: None
Other: 2x Speakers, DPDT Switch, Spring steel switch parts
Number of circuits published: 12 (in booklet supplied with the EE8)
Box size: 363mm x 260mm x 60mm


9 In One Electronic Kit

No manufacturer name present on any part of the kit.

Components are mounted on yellow plastic bases with vertical pins to make the connections. Underneath each component base is two lugs that fit in to the holes on the hardboard baseboard to keep them in place.

The wires have u-shaped ends that are clipped on to the pegs of the components.

Each component has a number on each peg. Follow the wiring steps to complete the circuit.

Factfile:
Approximate year of release: 1960's
Power source: 1 x PP3 9V battery
Transistors: 2
Resistors: 7
Capacitors: 6
Diodes: 0
Other Components: Variable resistor, Variable Capacitor, Audio Transformer
Other: Earphone, Tuning Coil, Morse Key
Number of circuits published: 9
Circuit construction: A piece of hardboard with a grid of holes allows the plastic-mounted components to be placed on it, positioned as shown in the manual. The u-shaped clips are then pushed onto the vertical posts on each component to complete the circuit.
Box size: 365mm x 215mm x 50mm


Lumen 20 in One Project Kit

Consists of 5 modules, each mounted with a set of components. Spring connectors on each allow wires to be connected to complete the circuit.

Instead of a meter, this kit has a compass surrounded by a coil to make a galvanometer:

Underneath the compass, within the red base, is a bulb.

The manual is tiny, and has a double-page for each project. Each consists of a description and a wiring diagram (no circuit diagrams):

Along with the usual radio, morse buzzer, continuity tester etc that is common for most kits, this also has a more unusual circuit (yes, that is a fish !) ...

There is an error in that wiring diagram - if you follow that then when you press the switch you'll short circuit the battery! The two leads from the battery/switch module should go across the transformer, and not connected to each other. Description (with typo!) follows...

The solar battery (more accurately, it should be called a solar cell) that is mounted on the board is tiny - only 5mm square. Some kits that I have seen have cells the same size as the white outline (approx 25mm x 35mm) while others are the same as this one. Presumably this is a later model, so uses a more modern, smaller cell?
Here is a picture to show it. It just "floats" on two wires poked through the middle hole...

Factfile:
Approximate year of release: 196? (no date on the unit)
Power source: 1x AA cell
Transistors: 1
Resistors: 2
Capacitors: 3
Diodes: 1
Other Components:  Solar Cell, Bulb, Variable Capacitor
Other: Crystal Earphone, Morse Key, Ferrite Rod Aerial, Compass Galvanometer.
Number of circuits published: 20
Circuit construction: Components are permanently mounted on plastic panels. Springs at each end allow connections to be made. The spring is bent and a wire is pushed into the opened coil of the spring. The spring is then released to hold the wire.
Box size: 365mm x 248mm x 85mm


Heathkit Jr Deluxe Electronic Workshop

A very well constructed item. Supplied as a complete kit that required the steel frame to be bolted to the hardboard circuit board. Springs are bolted to this board and the component legs wrapped around the bolts on the underneath of the board. A very solid and impressive construction.
The manual is extremely detailed and provides step-by-step construction of the unit plus a very good description of all of the circuits along with modifications that can be done. The external speaker and morse key are mounted in a steel box and can be connected to the main unit with a long length of wire. The tuning capacitor an air-spaced. The batteries are mounted underneath the board.

Here is a 4 transistor loudspeaker radio:

Factfile:
Approximate year of release: 1969
Power source: 4x D cells
Transistors: 4
Resistors: 11
Capacitors: 8
Diodes: 0
Other Components:  LDR, Bulb, Relay, Variable Capacitor, Switched Potentiometer, DPDT slide switch
Other: Speaker, Morse Key, External Morse Key and Speaker, Ferrite Rod aerial, Meter.
Number of circuits published: 35
Circuit construction: Components are permanently mounted on the hardboard panel. Springs at each end allow connections to be made. The spring is bent and a wire is pushed into the opened coil of the spring. The spring is then released to hold the wire.
Box size: 560mm x 310mm x 105mm


Radionic X30

Contained in a cardboard box with a very nice red velvet type finish. Construction is the same as the Philips Radionic X40. The X30 is an earlier kit than the X40, however, and does not have the "Philips" mark. Components are bolted onto the PCB and the pads of the component bases make contact with the PCB tracks.

Factfile:
Approximate year of release: 1969
Power source: PP9 (9V)
Transistors: 2
Resistors: 7
Capacitors: 5
Diodes: 1
Other Components:  LDR, Variable Capacitor, bulb
Other: Earphone, bulb holder, Tuning Coil
Number of circuits published: 40
Circuit construction: Lay the PCB printed circuit side upwards. Each component is mounted on a plastic former with the component leads soldered to 2 or 3 brass 6BA bolts. These bolts pass through the holes on the PCB and nuts are attached at the rear to secure the component against the track on the PCB.
Box size: 323mm x 245mm x 55mm


Denshi Board SR-1A

A simple earphone radio:

A typical component within a plastic block. The contacts can be seen protruding out of the bottom:

 

Factfile:
Approximate year of release: Late 60's (pre-decimalisation), original cost 4/19/6 (on box)
Power source: 1x PP3 battery
Transistors: 1
Resistors: 4
Capacitors: 3
Diodes: 2
Other Components: Audio Transformer, Inductor
Other: Earphone, Morse Key, Tuning Assembly
Number of circuits published: 16
Circuit construction: An 8x5 matrix of holes in a plastic base where the protruding contacts on the encapsulated components are pushed in. Adjacent components are pushed into one of the same holes, making the component contacts touch each other. The circuit is completed by pushing in spring metal clips into the same holes to touch the components.
Box size: 294mm x 172mm x 40mm


Lafayette 150-In-1


Thomas Salter Electrical Lab 4

Available as Lab 1,2,3 or 4. This is the largest of the labs. Parts allow construction of simple electrical/electromagnetic circuits. A rheostat allows current to be controlled. Parts for the larger labs (this one) allow a construction of a motor. Also included are compasses, bulbs etc.
The same manual is supplied with all sizes of the lab. I originally had Lab 1 when I was a kid.

 

Factfile:
Approximate year of release: Early 70's
Power source: 1x or 2x D cells
Circuit construction: Self-tapper screws are inserted into the red or yellow plastic baseboards and the wires are wrapped around the screws then tightened.
Box size: 515mm x 625mm x 48mm


Logix-Kosmos Science Fun Experiments In Electronics

This was my first electronics kit and is what started me with electronics when I was seven or eight. Very little remains of my original, but the red breadboard shown below is what I still have. I have now managed to get a replacement (40 years on) which is in excellent condition and 100% complete (I had "original" spares to replace every part that was missing), as you can see in the pictures above. On the board shown below is a circuit of a "Lighthouse Light" (a slowly flashing light) and was the very first electronic circuit that I ever built along with the layout as it appeared in the manual. Also see the identical re-badged "Science Fair Electronics 40 Research Lab Kit" below.

The components are un-mounted so care was needed not to snap the wires, especially the transistors.
Three AA cells are mounted underneath the module and provide power to the top left and bottom right contact strips.

The manual and box has the best and easiest description of how a transistor works that I have ever seen, using a water canal analogy showing how base flow opens the collector/emitter flow...

Factfile:
Approximate year of release: 1973
Power source: 3x AA cells
Transistors: 2
Resistors: 7
Capacitors: 7
Diodes: 1
Other: Earphone, miniature morse key / push switch, Tuning coil, bulb
Number of circuits published: 40
Circuit construction: Component leads are pushed into the holes of the metal contacts on the breadboard.


Science Fair Electronics 40 Research Lab Kit
(Logix-Kosmos Science Fun Experiments In Electronics)

This is IDENTICAL to the Logix-Kosmos "Science Fun Experiments In Electronics" above - identical manual (compare to the Logix Kosmos kit above) but with a different heading on the front cover. Manufactured by Logix-Kosmos. The manual is superb and goes into great detail of each circuit.

Impressively, when I bought this, 39 years after it was made (2013), it was still fully factory sealed in it's original plastic, so is therefore in "perfect" condition, as can be seen here:

...amazing to open it after all that time. I carefully cut along one side so that I could slide the plastic off. I have slid it back in the plastic.

Factfile:
Approximate year of release: 1974
Power source: 3x AA cells
Transistors: 2
Resistors: 7
Capacitors: 7
Diodes: 1
Other: Earphone, miniature morse key / push switch, Tuning coil, bulb
Number of circuits published: 40
Circuit construction: Component leads are pushed into the holes of the metal contacts on the breadboard.


Science Fun Experiments In Super Electronics 1

A follow-up to the Science Fun Experiments In Electronics. Two breadboards instead of one, more components and more experiments. A switch is fitted to the yellow block and the battery pack normally attaches underneath the yellow block (although some experiments use only the red one, so it is then installed under the red block).

As for the smaller set, the manual is excellent and covers each circuit in great detail.

Factfile:
Approximate year of release: 1974
Power source: 3x AA cells
Transistors: 2
Resistors: 10
Capacitors: 9
Diodes: 1
Other: Earphone, 2 x miniature morse key / push switch, Tuning coil, 2 x bulbs, variable resistor
Circuit construction: Component leads are pushed into the holes of the metal contacts on the breadboard.


Logix-Kosmos Motor Generator

The armature and commutator are supplied as individual metal parts. The complete motor (or generator) is constructed following the instructions and diagrams.
Enamelled copper wire is supplied to wind the armature.

Here is an example diagram showing part of the armature construction.

Factfile:
Approximate year of release: 1974
Power source: 2x C cells
Box size: 260mm x 235mm x 45mm


Denshi Block SR 3A Deluxe

Note - the meter is just a stuck-on piece of paper. You didn't get the meter unless you went for the "SR 4A Deluxe" !

The component blocks are the same construction as the ones in the SR-1A shown above.

A three transistor reflex speaker radio:

Factfile:
Approximate year of release: 1974 (original version)
Power source: 1x PP3 battery
Transistors: 3
Resistors: 18
Capacitors: 13
Diodes: 2
Other Components: 3x Audio/input transformers, Inductor, bulb, LDR
Other: Earphone, Morse Key, Tuning Assembly, Crystal microphone, test probes, speaker, external speaker, solar cell, phono connector.
Number of circuits published: 105
Circuit construction: Three boards each with 8x5 matrix of holes in a plastic base where the protruding contacts on the encapsulated components are pushed in. Adjacent components are pushed into one of the same holes, making the component contacts touch each other. The circuit is completed by pushing in spring metal clips into the same holes to touch the components.
Box size: 412mm x 363mm x 91mm


Denshi Block SR 4A Deluxe


Denshi Block ST 100

A very neat enclosure with a built-in amplifier. A PP3 battery is mounted in the amplifier module.

A radio built in the case:

A typical component within a plastic block. The contacts can be seen running up each side and the circuit symbol is shown on the top:

 

Factfile:
Approximate year of release: 1974
Power source: 1x PP3 battery
Transistors: 2
Resistors: 9
Capacitors: 8
Diodes: 2
Other Components: Audio Transformer, Inductor
Other: Earphone, Morse Key, Tuning Assembly, Amplifier/Speaker Module, Test Probes, Enclosed Case
Number of circuits published: 100
Circuit construction: The case has an area with 6x5 squares where the square encapsulated components/wires are inserted. Each component has 2 or more contacts which touch when placed in this grid to form a circuit. Contacts on the edge of the amplifier module touch the appropriate component contacts to complete the circuit.
Box size: 365mm x 224mm x 60mm


Philips Radionic X40

A typical component, mounted on a plastic former with the leads soldered to the end of brass 6BA threaded bolts is shown below. The brass area on the underside of the component mount makes contact with the PCB layout when secured to it.

Here is the PCB that is used to make the all of the circuits:

and here is a radio built on that board along with the manual page for that experiment:

The experiment above is the same as the one shown on the box cover.

Factfile:
Approximate year of release: 1975/6
Power source: PP9 (9V)
Transistors: 4
Resistors: 11
Capacitors: 7
Diodes: 2
Other Components:  LDR, Variable Capacitor, 2x bulbs
Other: Earphone, 2x bulb holders, Tuning Coil
Number of circuits published: 40
Circuit construction: Lay the PCB printed circuit side upwards. Each component is mounted on a plastic former with the component leads soldered to 2 or 3 brass 6BA bolts. These bolts pass through the holes on the PCB and nuts are attached at the rear to secure the component against the track on the PCB.
Box size: 494mm x 334mm x 53mm


Super Electronic Thing Kit (Ensemble Super Electronique)
(Logix-Kosmos Science Fun Experiments In Super Electronics I)

This is the same as the Logix Kosmos Science Fun Experiments In Super Electronics I (manufactured by the same company) - see above. Originally released in 1974, this particular kit is from 1976. Logix Kosmos branding internally, and the manual is "Science Fun Experiments In Super Electronics I".

A slightly different version was released again by Flair Toys in 1979 as "Magnus Pyke's Science Fun Electronics" (see below).

Factfile:
Approximate year of release: 1974/1976
Power source: 3 x AA cells
Transistors: 2
Resistors: 10
Capacitors: 9
Diodes: 1
Other Components: Variable resistor, 2x bulbs
Other: Earphone, Tuning Coil
Number of circuits published: 15+ (several experiments for each)
Circuit construction: A card can be placed on top of the breadboards (optional) and then the components plugged into the metal strips through the holes in the card, following the circuit shown on the card.
Box size: 607mm x 352mm x 60mm


Denshi-Gakken EX-150

This was the second kit that I owned and still have it. Every item including the cardboard inserts and bubble-wrap (removed for the picture) is still there. The construction of the main unit and of the blocks is in the same style as the older Denshi Block ST100 shown above.

Circuit no. 45 (Radio) built in the case:

A typical component within a plastic block. This is the same construction as the Denshi Blocks. The contacts can be seen running up each side:

Factfile:
Year of release: 1978 for 39.75
Power source: 4x AA cells
Transistors: 2
Resistors: 15
Capacitors: 9
Diodes: 2
Other Components:  LDR, 2x Bulbs, Audio Transformer, Inductor, LDR
Other: Speaker, Morse Key, IC amplifier and Speaker, Ferrite Rod aerial assembly, Meter
Number of circuits published: 150
Circuit construction: The case has an area with 6x8 squares where the square encapsulated components/wires are inserted. Each component has 2 or more contacts which touch when placed in this grid to form a circuit. Contacts on the edge of the area that connect to the battery, amplifier module, meter, LDR and the tuning block touch the appropriate component contacts to complete the circuit.
Box size: 345mm x 293mm x 71mm


Mykit System 7
(Radionic / Gakken)


Magnus Pyke's Science Fun Electronics

This is a newer version of the "Science Fun Experiments In Electronics" ("Super Electronics I") that appeared a few years before.
By Flair Toys Limited, although some of the inside has the original Logix Kosmos logo that appeared on the older kits. Contains fewer experiments in the manual compared to the "Super Electronics I" kit but basically about the same number of circuits used to create the experiments. The diagrams that it contains, however, are identical (same diagrams) to those in the earlier "Super Electronics I" kit.

Here is the (regenerative) radio circuit (the most complex experiment) built. Tuning is achieved by turning the ferrite slug in the blue coil former and/or changing the capacitors that form part of the tuned circuit. Batteries are mounted under the yellow block...

To make assembly easier, cards are provided that can be (optionally) placed over the breadboards, with holes punched to allow component leads to be passed through and connected to the breadboards. Here is a card that could have been used on the above layout:

A manual page showing part of the construction for the radio shown above:

Here is another project - experiment 8 - "Hazard Warning Light" (twin bulb flasher) along with the manual page.

Factfile:
Approximate year of release: 1979
Power source: 3 x AA cells
Transistors: 2
Resistors: 10
Capacitors: 9
Diodes: 1
Other Components: Variable resistor, 2x bulbs
Other: Earphone, Tuning Coil
Number of circuits published: 15
Circuit construction: A card can be placed on top of the breadboards (optional) and then the components plugged into the metal strips through the holes in the card, following the circuit shown on the card.
Box size: 607mm x 352mm x 60mm


Science Fair 160 in One

A wooden case with a cardboard cover. The baseboard is made of cardboard and the component connections are made via springs.


Solar Power Lab

Mainly made out of cardboard with two plastic end cheeks holding the shape. Uses the popular spring terminals to make the connections to the components.


Microcomputer Trainer

Although more of a computer than an electonics kit, this still required (minimal) wiring to be done. The processor is actually a TMS1100 which is programmed with a simple interpreter. The machine that is emulated with this processor consists of 16 instructions and has some built-in games and subroutines. Small programs can be entered using the keypad and then either run or stepped through depending on whether 2 or 6 is pressed before the "run" key. The built-in games are run by entering other codes before pressing the run key. The program address is shown on the binary LEDs and the data / program output is shown on the hex LED.

Construction of the unit is very similar to the solar power lab shown above, being made out of cardboard with the end cheeks being made out of plastic. The 6 AA batteries are mounted underneath.


Computer Logic Lab

A selection of digital and hybrid (analogue/digital) circuits centred around a 74LS00 integrated circuit (quad NAND gate). Uses the popular spring terminals to make the connections to the components.

Factfile:
Approximate year of release: 1986
Power source: 3 x AA cells
Transistors: 0
Resistors: 11 (2 of these connected in series with the LEDs)
Capacitors: 4
Diodes: 0
Other Components: 74LS00, 2x LEDs
Other: Earphone
Number of circuits published: 60
Components are permanently mounted on the hardboard panel. Springs at each end allow connections to be made. The spring is bent and a wire is pushed into the opened coil of the spring. The spring is then released to hold the wire.
Box size: 413mm x 262mm x 95mm


Science Fair 200 in One

A very neat front panel on this kit. All components mounted on the main board or on the front panel with connections made using the popular spring connectors.


Tree Of Knowledge World Of Radio & Electronics


Intertan 300 in One


Unilab Adventures With Electronics

The book is not supplied as standard with the kit (strange). Construction of all circuits is made on the then-popular "S-DEC" plug block module.

Factfile:
Approximate year of release: Late 1980's?
Power source: Ever Ready 126 (4.5V)
Transistors: 4
Resistors: 20
Capacitors: 9
Diodes: 2
Other Components: ZN484 radio IC, 2x Bulbs, Thermistor, Variable Capacitor, variable resistor, LDR
Other: Earphone, Speaker, 2x bulb holders, S-Dec, Crocodile Clip, Ferrite rod, Battery
Number of circuits published: 16
Circuit construction: Plug the component wires into the supplied S-Dec breadboard.
Box size: 382mm x 254mm x 45mm


LINKS

Some of my pages

INDEX PAGE - Go here for access to all of my pages along with my eMail details
Build your own ZX80 - my page showing you how to build this old micro
   |__ ZX80 to ZX81 conversion - build the NMI generator needed to convert the ZX80 circuit into a ZX81
   |__ ZX80 software - Type in a Space Invaders game into the ZX80
Build your own Jupiter Ace - my page showing you how to build this old micro
Build your own UK101 - my page showing you how to build a greatly simplified version of this old micro
A simple 6809 machine - can't get simpler than this for a machine that can run Microsoft Basic
A simple Z80 machine - similar to the 6809 machine, can't get simpler than this for a machine that can run Microsoft Basic
CP/M with 9 chips - build a fully functional CP/M machine with a minimal chip count and CF card storage
Pong - Pictures of my build of the Atari classic arcade game
Practical Wireless Tele-Tennis - A rebuild of the 1974 articles for this home Pong game
My Machines - My collection of classic 80's micros
My TV games - my collection of "pong" style games from the 70's
My electronics kits - my collection of electronics kits from 60's, 70's and 80's


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